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New Collection: DDMA2 - Despairing Destiny Modern Art 2


15 January 2018


This week's new collection is DDMA2. Like the first DDMA, this collection focuses on works that are abstract yet meaningful, presenting a distressing and melancholic view of a universe too big to control, a universe which we have no say in. Last of the Lights is a fair representation here, envisioning the death of the sun and stars, the disappearance of light from our universe, and the bleakness that results. That there remains color in this work reflects the latent hope that such is not the end, that we can continue forward despite this inexorable disaster. Pond-Tainted Watcher portray some sort of animal, amphibian-like. The poor animal looks frayed and tired, forcing itself to carry on simply because it has no other paths. But doing so is difficult because it has tragically been burned and degraded by the environment in which it has been forced to live. Crowded Passage Outwards is another fairly concrete work using a motif that's been seen before; however, its uses of vertical lines cut off abruptly, background contours, and negative space, make it one of the best works of its archetype, and one that portrays a deep and relatable anxiety and claustrophobia. Gassy Light is a fascinating, hopeless work that uses a truly interesting and very effective shading style to emphasize the pollution and dirtiness of its setting. The mood this work evokes is paradoxical, half hopeful and half hopeless. And finally of note, my personal favorite work this week is Stasis Reflecting Dynamism, a work with similarly interesting shading and use of color contrast, and a work too abstract to really describe any other way, except to say that it felt like it belonged in this collection in particular. Please enjoy!



ROLLING SUNSET BREEZE

24 April 2017


A calming work, representative of an entire class of the works in this gallery. The sunset motif is heavily visible in the background's orange-red color scheme, with the setting sun reflected in the lighter areas of the background. The feeling rolls across the smooth yet turbulent foreground from light into shadow, representing the shift from day into night.

PULSE EFFECT

26 September 2016


This work uses Moire to its fullest extent. A neon pulse comes from one edge of the image, breaking up and causing cracks in some structure. The pulse's light illuminates the colors and textures of the structure, displaying rough bits of color. This is one of the most fascinating works in MOMA's galleries, with a lot of depth and an inventive and fantastic image. There is a lot to ponder here.

VENEREAN LANDSCAPE

22 October 2015


The name of this work is inspired by its intense warmth. Comprable, perhaps, to the surface of the planet Venus, only with less noxious gas. Like the planet venus, as Venerean Landscape ascends from the bottom, rises in altitude, it becomes less intense and more calming, to match Venus's upper atmosphere and general exterior appearance. Perhaps it is an utterly hellish place, but at least from our point of view, Venus is indeed a truly beautiful planet.

MEGA RIPPLE WAVE

19 November 2015


Some sort of wave travels along, and as it reaches the center of this work it expands and reaches a sort of explosion, from which it departs in a marvelous array of colors. It is abstraction incarnate - what this picture really displays is impossible to understand, but it begs to be examined and reexamined, and admired for its beauty, its incomprehensibility.

DEEP POND

22 May 2015


Why are ponds green? I dunno. But then, sometimes you just have to jump in, and maybe it'll make sense. This was the first work in the Monitors of Modern Art library, and is a very strong start. It is a beautiful, yet simple, metaphor.